Overweight, Or Obese What Is The Difference?

Overweight, Or Obese What Is The Difference?

According to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, by 2030 42% of Americans will be obese. Further it stated that by that time the number of Americans severely obese, one hundred pounds or more overweight, will have increased twofold to approximately 11%. This equates to over ½ trillion dollars in healthcare costs. Of these numbers, about half of obese adults were obese in childhood. The numbers of obese American children hover around 17%.

But that’s the obese you say? What about people that are “merely” overweight?And what”s the difference between being overweight and being obese? Well let’s look at some numbers. Both terms “overweight” and “obese” refer to a condition of being over the weight considered healthy for a given height and age. The cold hard numbers are based on a persons BMI, or, “body mass index”. The BMI is a number that is determined by a persons’ body weight to height ratio.

Generally a person with a BMI of 25-29.9 is considered to be overweight, while persons with a BMI greater than 30 are considered to be obese. These numbers are not a direct measure of body fat, but rather a correlation of body fat to body mass/height. If you are concerned about your weight, or merely curious, you can check your BMI with our body mass index calculator.
Beyond merely assessing you body fat ration, a BMI check may also determine certain health risks. The CDC lists several conditions that persons being overweight or obese are at greater risk of developing;