Something about Colored Contact Lenses

Something about Colored Contact Lenses

Sometimes, we seem to forget what a blessing the human eye is. We love talking about philosophers and dreamers that look into the future. But we seem to forget that we are gifted with a pair of complex visual systems that make us see what’s going on in front of us.

Eyes are an intricate mechanism that science is yet to uncover. There have been countless inventions to assist people who don’t have a perfect vision, and why not—35% of adults don’t have a 20/20 vision. To assist this hefty chunk of population, spectacles came out, and then contact lenses followed the optician’s finger.

Spectacles were nothing less than a fashion statement in times before. Same goes for the present and the future as well. There’s a thin line between an optician’s store and luxurious outlets when it comes to glasses, and now contact lenses are falling into the same category. Come to think of it, contact lenses do what glasses were meant to do, and one can’t even figure out that you are sporting contacts. Sneaky, right?

Why are Contact Lenses in Demand?

To just put it, contact lenses are in demand because they’re slick (yet graceful) little curves that you can put inside your eye and forget. No need to carry the burden of glasses on your nose as contact lenses set you free from it. It is very easy to put them on and take them off. Although unlike good ol’ specs, contacts require intense care and attention.

But it’s nothing more than basic stuff. Caring involves taking them off before sleeping, keeping the lens hydrated in solution and most importantly, getting a new pair before the current one expires. If you can keep track of all that and take the lens kit with you (don’t forget the glasses), you’re all set to switch to contacts.

In most cases, people get contacts to get rid of glasses, and in some cases, it’s a mere novelty. And like one needs a prescription to get glasses made, the same prescription is required for contacts too. But what about colored contacts? Do you need a prescription to get those? Read away and demystify your doubts.

What’s up with Colored Contact Lenses?

Just like there are millions of choices when it comes to glasses, people wanted the ‘novelty’ element in contact lenses too. And that’s when colored contact lenses came into the iris—these contact lenses do everything that is to be done, along with sporting a distinct shade of color.

Colored contact lenses come in numerous shades. One might take the highway and pick out a completely different color to spice it up, while another might prefer a subtle transition. There are plenty of places to shop for colored lenses.  For instance, Contactlenses4 US is one of the grandest online stores for colored contacts in a market that is scaling to new heights every day.

However, we can’t just buy contacts to try them on. There’s a lot of thinking to be done. Did you know that there are three types of colored contact lenses? First of all, you have to decide which one suits you the most:

  1. Visibility Tint Lenses

The visibility tint lenses aren’t for the color element, but they have little blush of green/blue color. Lenses are tinted so that the user can quickly put them on and remove them. They do not affect the eye color in any way, but they’re easy to find in case you drop them.

  1. Enhancement Tint Lenses

Now let’s get to color part—the enhancement tint lenses give a denser look to your eyes. These see-through lenses are for people who’ve got light eye shades. If you’re the one with a light iris color, this tint would enhance your shade and beautify it on another level. Enhancement tint might not work on people with dark eyes.

  1. Opaque Tint Lenses

Speaking of dark-eyed humans, the opaque tint lenses are the most popular ones. Technically, if people with dark eyes are looking for a change of color, opaque tint is the best bet. Opaque tint lenses come in many fancy colors as well and sell like hot cakes on occasions like Halloween. These festive opaque tint lenses are also for ‘Plano,’ i.e., they’re just for cosmetic purposes.

Contact lenses have a primary purpose of fixing up the user’s vision. But when it comes to colored contact lenses, people buy them for the sake of novelty, and in some cases, there is no vision problem. So the question comes in mind—do we need a prescription to buy colored contact lenses, or we can pick them up, no questions asked?

Do I need a Prescription to get Colored Contacts?

Well, in typical instances you need an exclusive prescription to get contacts, just like you do with glasses. For the ones with imperfect vision, the prescription is a must so that the contacts do their thing—help you see well. But colored contact lenses can be picked up with your spectacle-prescription too.

Various retail stores and the Contactlenses4 US, the online lens-store sell contacts without a prescription. There’s no need to get your eyes tested exclusively for buying new contacts. It’s quite a struggle to get contacts when one hasn’t been prescribed, but with your glasses’ prescription, you can pick up new lenses and sport them all over the place.

Colored contacts are available for people who don’t need spectacles as well—FreshLook offers a distinct range of colored contact lenses on Contactlenses4 US. It’s especially for people with weak eyesight as well as people who scored a 20/20 in the eye test.

They say that eyes are the only way into a person’s heart. If you are planning to make an impression with your eyes—be it a bold transition from brown to turquoise or a more subtle one from hazel to dark brown, make an impact with colored contact lenses. They’re safe, fun, and you’ll catch people’s eyes!

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HealthStatus teams with authors from other organizations to share interesting ideas, products and new health information to our readers.These articles are independently written and do not necessarily agree with the opinions or positions of HealthStatus.
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HealthStatus teams with authors from other organizations to share interesting ideas, products and new health information to our readers. These articles are independently written and do not necessarily agree with the opinions or positions of HealthStatus.

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