Yoghurt And High Blood Pressure

Yoghurt And High Blood Pressure

Most of us know that having an occasional cup of low fat yoghurt is great for a healthy digestion. Yoghurt has also been proven to help maintaining good body weight and lower body mass index. Scientists are now finding that regular consumption of yoghurt also lowers our risk of high blood pressure. This information has been presented at this year’s Scientific Session of the High Blood Pressure Research of the American Heart Association, but has not been published in any peer-reviewed journal yet.

How yoghurt keeps blood pressure under control?

High blood pressure is complicated and if not treated, it can cause scars on the arteries’ walls. These scars then trap cholesterol, plague and other debris in the blood, leading to possible blockages of arteries.

The top number in the blood pressure measurement is called systolic blood pressure. This number shows the pressure of blood against the arteries’ walls, caused by the heart beat. Eating yoghurt lowers the systolic blood pressure.

The study that brought the latest information on the link between yoghurt and blood pressure lasted 15 years and involved about 2,000 participants with normal blood pressure when the study began. Of those who had one cup of low fat yogurt every few days, 31 percent did not develop high blood pressure.

What is in yogurt?

Yogurt, especially low fat, is great addition to any healthy diet. It is rich source of calcium, protein and vitamin D. It makes great breakfast or a snack because it gives the feeling of being full longer than other foods. It is delicious alone and it is even better combined with blended fruits.

The best yogurts are those that contain live bacteria. It is that bacteria in yoghurt that does most of the job when it comes to our health. The less sugar the yogurt contains, the better. Read the labels to ensure that you are getting the right stuff.

Of course, no amount of yoghurt will help you stay healthy if you do not combine it with balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables and regular exercise. There are no magic bullets.