7 Things To Maintain Great Oral Hygiene

7 Things To Maintain Great Oral Hygiene

Most people don’t like to make regular visits to the dentist for a few reasons. One, it’s just uncomfortable to have someone with their hands inside your mouth, poking and prodding your teeth and gums. Two, it’s impossible to talk back to the dentist when they try and talk to you. Lastly, it always seems like no matter how much you’re cleaning your teeth, it just doesn’t seem to be good enough.

Some dentists may just be perfectionists, other times they could be exactly right. After all, it is their job to make sure that you are practicing safe and healthy oral hygiene so your teeth don’t fall out of your head at a moment’s notice. They’re also trying to protect you against dental issues caused by outside forces or injury.

But what are some of the things you could be doing today to make sure you are practicing great oral hygiene? Keep reading to find out.

 

Brush and Floss

Well, no surprise here, right? You should be flossing and brushing on a regular basis. They are two of the easiest things you should be doing and you should be doing both of them multiple times every day.

The rule of thumb for brushing is two times per day, with flossing right after. Brushing at night is the more important of the two as it’s going to clear away all of that built-up bacteria and plaque that’s accumulated over the day.

Flossing does more than remove that annoying piece of spinach, but is also helps with inflammation and helps stimulate the gums for prolonged gum health.

 

Change the Way You Brush

Do you know how long you’re supposed to brush? Typical dentist advice says that you should be brushing for a minimum of two minutes every day, while some others recommend upping that number to three.

You should also be brushing your tongue. Why? Your tongue is also home to a lot of bacteria that is built up over the day. If you’re not comfortable taking your brush to your tongue, you can buy a tongue cleaner which does its job in a few short strokes.

If you can, buy an electric toothbrush as well. Electric toothbrushes often come with timers so you’re not under or over brushing. You won’t have to use as much pressure either when it comes to getting all of those hard to reach spots.

 

Use Mouthwash

Mouthwash, for many, is like torture. It does nothing but burn and people can’t wait to simply spit it out in the sink.

Mouthwash helps remove more plaque and acid that has built up over the course of the day while also giving your breath that lovely, fresh smell. While it shouldn’t be an outright substitute, mouthwash is ideal for those either too young or totally averse to flossing.

It can reach those spots in the back of your mouth where flossing and brushing can’t reach.

 

Regular Dental Visits

The rule of thumb for dental visits is two times per year for regular cleanings. Regular cleanings are just part of the visit, and your dentist can advise you on any other dental procedures you may need.

They can also answer any questions you have in regards to dental health. If you haven’t scheduled your cleaning this year, go ahead and schedule your first and clear your schedule six months from now for your second one!

 

Watch Your Diet

Diet is important for all aspects of health, but it can also have great effects on your oral health as well. Be sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day, especially after finishing a meal. That post-dinner glass of water is going to help clear away plaque and acid that may have accumulated during your meal.

Eat lots of fruits and vegetables, not just for the vitamins and minerals, but also to help give your jaw a workout. Some dentists recommend leaving a whole apple for children so they can build up their early jaw strength instead of eating mushy food.

Avoid over acidic drinks and food, like some fruits and drinks. Coffee, soda and tea should all be taken in moderation as long-term consumption can cause both tooth and gum problems.

 

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HealthStatus teams with authors from other organizations to share interesting ideas, products and new health information to our readers.These articles are independently written and do not necessarily agree with the opinions or positions of HealthStatus.

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HealthStatus teams with authors from other organizations to share interesting ideas, products and new health information to our readers. These articles are independently written and do not necessarily agree with the opinions or positions of HealthStatus.

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