How To Deal With A Child’s Fever?

How To Deal With A Child’s Fever?

For parents or guardians, a child’s fever can be a cause for concern. This is especially true if your child starts to complain about being uncomfortable or if they have a history of febrile convulsions. A child’s fever should be treated as soon as possible to prevent it from getting worse and ensure that your child is safe from any type of infection.

Noticing that your child has a fever can be alarming, but fortunately, there are actually several ways on how you can deal with this situation. You can follow simple rules to make your child more comfortable and safe even when they have a fever.

Here’s how you can effectively deal with a child’s fever:

 

  1. Ask Help From A Medical Professional

 

More often than not, your child experiences a fever because their body is increasing its temperature to kill germs and bacteria. A child’s fever often means that the body is working perfectly in fighting off invaders that can cause more serious illnesses and diseases.

However, if you think that your child has a more severe fever that has been persistent for days, it might be best if you ask help from professionals, such as those from ifpeds.com. Asking medical advice from professionals is one of the most effective and easiest ways of treating a child’s fever.

Aside from a high fever lasting for more than three days, you should definitely call professionals the moment you notice any of the following symptoms:

  • You can feel and see a soft bulge in your child’s skull;
  • Your child experiences seizures and has developed rashes due to the fever;
  • Your child is manifesting symptoms of dehydration, such as crying without any tears, not wetting their diapers, and a dry mouth;
  • Your child is susceptible to serious infections, has blood and immune disorders, or has not received any immunizations; and
  • Your child repeatedly vomits and suffers from extreme diarrhea.

 

  1. Provide Medications

 

Treating a child’s fever can become an easier task if you know what medications to give to your child. If your child’s fever doesn’t come with other symptoms, these medications are usually enough to make them feel better.

Children older than three months old can take children’s acetaminophen. With proper doses, this medication can effectively treat fever and reduce other health issues, such as colds, flu, and sore throat. Children who are more than six months old can take ibuprofen to treat fever.

If you want to be sure about the doses of these medications, make sure that you reach out to your doctor and wait for their instructions. Since doses are usually given based on the child’s weight, your doctor might require you to weigh your child before giving them any type of medication.

When giving medication to your child, make sure that you follow your doctor’s orders and never attempt to double up on medications or the dosage. Letting your child take two or more medications at once isn’t only ineffective, but it can also take a toll on your child’s health and safety.

 

  1. Adjust Their Clothing

 

Your child will feel extremely cold when they have a fever. More often than not, a fever can cause them to shiver and chill even if the room is too humid.

To ensure that your child stays comfortable even when they have a fever, adjust their clothing to better suit their body temperature. It’s best to have your child wear clothes made from breathable and lightweight fabrics if they have a fever. You can also provide a light blanket to keep them cool and comfortable, especially during the night.

Overdressing your child is a big no-no when they have a fever. Doing this will only make your child uncomfortable and irritable, and can also compromise their body’s natural ability to cool down.

 

  1. Offer More Fluids

 

Whenever your child has a fever, their body’s temperature will increase and will require higher amounts of liquid in order to function properly. The inability to cope with this cycle can cause dehydration and fluid loss to your children. Once this happens, your child will have cracked lips, dry mouth, low energy levels, and will pass less urine than normal.

Staying hydrated is crucial when your child has a fever, which is why you should regularly give fluids to them. Prepare water, fresh fruit juices, and chicken broths for your child and encourage them to drink at least eight glasses of liquids every day.

Aside from decreasing your child’s susceptibility to dehydration, drinking a lot of fluids can also cool off your child’s body, allowing them to stay comfortable even when they have a fever.

 

  1. Give A Sponge Bath

 

One of the oldest tricks in the book when it comes to treating a child’s fever is to give them a sponge bath. Although this isn’t a requirement, a sponge bath can actually reduce your child’s fever faster. This works because a sponge bath with a comfortable water temperature can help your child’s body to relax and gradually bring down the fever.

When giving your child a sponge bath as an attempt to treat a fever, it’s important not to mix the water with alcohol. Alcohol doesn’t impact your child’s body temperature or reduce their fever. On the contrary, alcohol is very dangerous for children, especially when they accidentally ingested it.

Additionally, make sure that you’re not using cold water when giving your child a sponge bath.

Cold water can cause your child to shiver and make their core temperature rise. This can make their fever worse and last longer.

 

Use The Right Resources

 

A fever isn’t a disease. But, it’s the body’s defense mechanism in fighting off germs and bacteria. A child’s fever is usually harmless and can go away on its own after three days. However, if you don’t want to take any risks and wait too long, you can start treating your child’s fever by using this article as your guide.

It’ll be easier for you to avoid panicking and efficiently treat your child’s fever if you actually know what to do. This article can also be a great source of information for first-time parents.

 

 

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HealthStatus teams with authors from other organizations to share interesting ideas, products and new health information to our readers.These articles are independently written and do not necessarily agree with the opinions or positions of HealthStatus.
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HealthStatus teams with authors from other organizations to share interesting ideas, products and new health information to our readers. These articles are independently written and do not necessarily agree with the opinions or positions of HealthStatus.

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