6 Sleep Problems That Occur During Your Period (And What To Do To Make Them Go Away)

6 Sleep Problems That Occur During Your Period (And What To Do To Make Them Go Away)

Women experience worse sleep during the days right before their periods and for a few days into their periods. Factors influencing sleep quality include cramps, bloating, headaches, heavy bleeding, and pain. Another factor that my contribute to poor sleep quality is increased body temperature. Body temperature increases by about half a degree after ovulation. To combat this rise in temperature, take a warm bath or shower before bed. The difference in temperature from the warm water to the cool bedroom can help with sleep. Severe PMS causes women to feel sleepier during the day then sleep poorly at night. Severe cramps from polycystic ovary syndrome, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), and dysmenorrhea also prevent sleep and cause women to wake up through the night. Hormone changes at this stage of the menstrual cycle can cause stress that leads to poor sleep quality. Deep breathing, yoga, and a worry log can reduce stress and make it easier to sleep. Women can take small naps during the day but avoid napping the evening. Napping late in the day will make it more difficult to sleep at night while napping during the morning or early afternoon can make women feel more rested and help reduce stress.

Key Points:

  • 1Women Report Sleeping Worse in the Days Leading Up To Their Period. Not surprisingly, menstrual problems — cramps, bloating, headaches, heavy bleeding, and pain — can lead to sleep problems. Women report worse sleep during the days prior to and during the first few days of their period.
  • 2Survival Tip:It’s more important than ever then to keep your bedroom at 60-67 degrees F. To “trick” your body into feeling sleepy, take a warm bath or shower prior to bed. The contrast between the warm bath and your cooler bedroom environment will make your body temperature drop and help with sleep onset.
  • 3Women with severe PMS feel sleepier during the day and have slower reaction times when premenstrual than at other times. PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), dysmenorrhea, and polycystic ovary syndrome cause sleep problems of their own. Women with strong cramps take longer to fall asleep and then sleep poorly.


It’s more important than ever then to keep your bedroom at 60-67 degrees F. To “trick” your body into feeling sleepy, take a warm bath or shower prior to bed. The contrast between the warm bath and your cooler bedroom environment will make your body temperature drop and help with sleep onset.

Read the full article at: https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-news/6-sleep-problems-occur-during-your-period-and-what-do-make-them-go-away

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HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators.The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.
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HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators. The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.

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