Living With The New Normal

Over the last six months, the world has become a new place to live in. After the initial lockdown, businesses remained closed, restaurants only opened to 50% capacity, wearing a mask became a requirement for survival, and CDC recommendations prohibited groups of 10 or more people from assembling. As summer bloomed, remaining positive has become difficult, but necessary to maintain good mental health.

 

What is the New Normal?

Although times are changing rapidly, it is essential to remain safe. Since a vaccine is still several months away, the best way to prevent illness is to not contract COVID-19 in the first place. The virus transmits mainly through aerosols from breathing. If a person who has contracted the virus sneezes or coughs, the virus could be breathed in by a healthy person standing too close. Not leaving your house is the best method to prevent spread, but not the most practical.

If you do have to leave your house, making a reservation for a hair appointment or even for retail shopping has become the new norm. Many shops are requiring patrons to make appointments to limit the number of people in the store. Hair and nail salons have implemented new reservation restrictions, ensuring no persons without an appointment are in the building.

Similarly, restaurants are operating at 50%, or less, capacity to maintain a six-foot distance between tables. It might seem like a hassle, but in the long run, it helps prevent the spread of disease and keeps everyone in the store safe.

If leaving your house is necessary, the CDC recommends a few easy to follow rules that will minimize contact with potentially infected people.

  • Wear a mask
  • Stand at least six feet apart from other people
  • Wash your hands frequently or use hand sanitizer
  • Be aware of your physical health

Anytime you leave the house, even if it is for a short time, you should follow the CDC guidelines. To assist in remembering a mask, place one in every car, or print off a sign that reminds you to bring a mask and tape it to the back of your door. Additionally, be conscious of the people around you and maintain at least six feet distance. Sometimes this is hard when at a grocery store, but there are usually signs on the ground as a reminder.

Washing your hands should be a given, but in the age of COVID-19, there must be extra effort to keep your hands clean. This doesn’t just mean after using the restroom, but before and after every meal. If you’ve been out of your house, wash your hands once you get home before doing other activities.

Also, being aware of your health can play a major role in preventing the spread of this virus. If you have the sniffles, a cough, a headache, and especially a fever, stay home.

 

How to “Run Errands” at Home

There are many ways to stay safe while out and about, but the best method to keep you and everyone else safe is to stay home when possible. Granted, there are instances when leaving your home is a must, but the internet provides ways for people to maintain their lifestyle without ever leaving their homes.

  • Most grocery/retail stores offer home delivery options
  • Order delivery for dinner instead of dine-in eating
  • Ask doctors if they provide a telemedicine option
  • Use Remote Patient Monitoring

 

How to Remain Positive

No one would argue that the new way of living is easy. As a whole, humans are social creatures, and being forced to remain isolated can be detrimental to mental health. There’s a balance between staying safe and maintaining relationships outside your home. While not everyone’s way of managing a healthy mind is the same, there are a few ways to keep your positivity.

 

  • Buy/Make fun masks to wear.

In July, one Twitter user shared her Dad’s photos of a matching tie and mask set, and the internet blew up. Self-expression is important, so what better way than to add a bit of pizazz to your masks? Not to mention it gives you a great hit of dopamine when someone compliments you.

 

  • Schedule a Facetime/Google Hangouts/Zoom meeting with friends.

Human interaction is great, but when we’re stuck at home for the good of society, what is there to do? Create a virtual cocktail hour, baking club, or just catch up with friends. Make a weekly scheduled meeting to give you something to look forward to all week.

 

  • Go for a walk in a park.

Studies have shown that spending just 20 minutes a day in a park or field with grass and trees can significantly boost mental health. Extra exercise is not needed to start feeling better, but it does help give your body a jolt of endorphins, which is linked to happiness.

 

  • Learn to meditate.

Whether through yoga, or general relaxation techniques, meditation has an impact on a happier mind. Meditation can happen anywhere and requires no special equipment. Several free channels on YouTube can help teach you some great techniques to transition into the new normal way of living.

 

The world is changing, and that is always scary. There are many resources to help learn how to live with this virus, from the CDC to health publications. How we take care of our physical health and maintain social relationships has changed, but those changes can be positive with a little work and mental restructuring.

 

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HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators.The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.
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HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators. The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.

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