A Typical Communication Pattern of People with Alzheimer’s Disease

A Typical Communication Pattern of People with Alzheimer’s Disease

As people live longer, we’re seeing an increase in how many deal with cognitive problems such as dementia. It can be an embarrassing problem, when your mind starts to fail you, and you’re aware it’s beginning to happen. For this reason, many patients in the earliest stages of dementia will often hide their symptoms of memory problems or difficulty in solving mental challenges. Especially when the problems manifest in basic or routine matters, like knowledge of loved ones or handling even normal everyday tasks.

This is referred to by cognitive researchers as Saving Appearance Responses, or SAR. Researchers are finding it’s far more frequent to engage in SAR than was initially suspected.

When people don’t want to admit they are having a memory problem, they don’t seek treatment quickly.  Getting treatment early is beneficial to everyone, the patient, their family and the doctors.  Early treatment can often delay symptoms and slow progression.

Using SARs or explanations to deflect from admitting cognitive impairment does not solve anything.  If we see this behavior in a loved one, getting them to a doctor for an accurate diagnosis may be the best thing we can do.

Doctors should remember to be respectful to patients in all instances, but especially when SAR behavior is suspected. The reason for the behavior isn’t that patients don’t want to get well, it’s that they fear humiliation, and often don’t know their cognitive problems could actually be a medical problem rather than a personal failing.

Key Points:

  • 1Keeping up appearances and pretending to know answers are typical “saving appearance responses” and are a warning sign of memory impairment.
  • 2People struggling with memory function may also be having issues with good judgement.
  • 3Hiding the severity of dementia disease can increase the frustration of those around them.


Researchers found that AD was 4.24 times more likely than Lewy body dementia to produce SARs, and 3.48 times more likely than mild cognitive impairment.

See the original at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-06-typical-pattern-people-alzheimer-disease.html

Do you need help in the area of Dementia Care?  Check out this available resource:  Fit Minds Family Caregiver Program

Follow us

HealthStatus

HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators.The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.
Follow us

Latest posts by HealthStatus (see all)

Share

HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators. The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *