Five Ways to Have Healthy Air in Winter

Five Ways to Have Healthy Air in Winter

Winter air tends to make healthy people a bit unhealthy. Cold air holds less moisture and indoor heating makes air extra dry. Sealing your home against drafts and air leaks is really counterproductive and a further cause for stale and germy air. There is little circulation in a home that is totally sealed and heated. Indoor air quality plunges your family into agonizing chapped lips, sinus infections, sore throats, flu, irritating flaky and itchy skin and colds. Gain your indoor air quality back and get health under control. Improve your home”s ventilation systems; maintain the furnace and check the relative indoor humidity.


Stay Healthy in Winter

  • Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter to get rid of dust and pet dander. If you are cooped up all winter, dusts and dander can get into your lungs. Vacuum at least once a week. Your HEPA filtered vacuum will stop the tiny dust and pet dander plus dust mites and their awful particles.  
  • Be proactive by cleaning surfaces and washing all linens in your home at least twice a week. This includes bedding, blankets and duvets. Use a quality detergent. Encase your mattresses and box springs in hypoallergenic covers. These types of covers eliminate the possibility of allergens, bacteria and virus from reaching your respiratory system.  
  • Keep your home vented properly. Use bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. Bring in fresh air. You won”t die from the cold if you crack windows open a bit. You might want to install an in-window air exchange system that pulls in filtered outside air without letting heated air escape.  
  • Keep your heating appliances checked. Furnaces, space heaters and wood burning stoves and fireplaces should be serviced and operated according to manufacturer”s specifications. Change air filters and clean out your ducts and chimneys.  
  • Control the humidity in your home. Once you have cleaned your air and it is warm and cozy, it is still dry. A humidifier may be the answer but too much moisture in the air can lead to rot, mold spores, and condensation. HVAC professionals suggest the indoor optimal humidity rate be maintained between 40% and 55%. Purchase a quality hygrometer to monitor indoor humidity and only use a humidifier when you need to. This means when the heater or furnace is on. Do keep room doors o